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Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs) - 1819 - Stafford


Stafford is an elevated post township, situated upon the northern border of the county and State, 26 miles norteasterly from Hartford; bounded on the north by Massachusetts line, on the east by Union and Willington, on the south by Willington and Ellington, and on the west by Ellington and Somers. Its mean length, from east to west, is 8 and a half miles, and its mean breadth, from north to south, more than 6 miles, comprising an area of about 53 square miles.

The general character of the township is that of an elevated, broken and mountainous country; but the western section is more conspicuously marked with these features.

Its geological structure is primitive; the rocks consisting of granite, micaceous schistus, and some other original formations. The prevailing soil is a gravelly loam, hard and dry, but affording very good grazing.

There are several minerals in the town, of which iron ore is the most important, and abounds in various places. Several mines of it have been opened, which supply the furnaces that have been erected in the town. The ore used most, is called bog ore, and is of an excellent quality for casting.

In the northerly section of the township, there is a valuable quarry of white fire proof stone, admirably calculated for furnace hearths; for which purpose it has been an article of exportation. It is a source of wealth to the proprietor, as well as of convenience to the public.

The forests in this town, which are considerably extensive, consist of oak, walnut, maple, ash, chesnut and other deciduous trees.

The agricultural productions consist of beef, cider, cider brandy, butter, cheese, wool and some others. The lands are best adapted to grazing; and consequently the cultivation of grain receives but little attention...

The population of Stafford, in 1810, was 2355; and there are about 320 Dwelling houses, 300 Freemen or Electors, and 3 Companies of Militia.

The amount of taxable property, as rated in the lists, in 1816, was $39,292.

The civil divisions of the town are 2 located Ecclesiastical Societies or Parishes, and 19 School Districts. Besides the located, there is a Society of Baptists, a Society of Methodists and one of Universalists. These several Societies are all accommodated with houses for public worship. There is a primary or common School maintained in each of the School Districts for a suitable portion of the year.

There are, in the town, 6 Mercantile Stores, 9 Taverns, 2 Social Libraries, 3 Clergymen, 4 Physicians and 2 Attornies.

The settlement of this town commenced about the year 1718, having been surveyed that year. Of the first settlers, two were from Europe, Mr. Matthew Thompson and Mr. Robert White; the rest were from Hadley and Woburn, Dedham and Weymouth, in Massachusetts, Haverhill, in New Hampshire, Windsor, Enfield and Preston, in this State. The first minister was settled in the town in 1723.

A Gazetteer of the States of Connecticut and Rhode-Island: Written with Care and Impartiality, from Original and Authentic Materials : Consisting of Two Parts ... : with an Accurate and Improved Map of Each State Authors John Chauncey Pease, John Milton Niles Publisher W.S. Marsh, 1819

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Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

Stafford, Connecticut, USA (Stafford Springs)

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