GreenerPasture.com

Sign In




Savannah, Georgia, USA - 1895 -Savannah


Savannah, an important commercial city and port of entry of Georgia, is situated on the Savannah River. It is the terminus of the Central Railroad of Georgia, the Charleston & Savannah Railway, and the Georgia division of the Savannah, Florida & Western Railway. It is 18 miles from the sea, has a fine harbor, and its wharves are accessible to vessels drawing 22 1/ 2 feet. By current improvements, it is proposed to deepen the channel to 26 feet. he city is built chiefly upon an elevated plain 50 feet above low water, is handsomely laid out, having in the centre a beautiful park called Forsyth Place and within its limits some 30 small parks, besides one in the suburbs of 300 acres. Several of these are adorned with statues and fountains, and, like the streets, are shaded by live oaks, pines, magnolias, palmettos, and other native trees. There are monuments to General Nathanael Greene, Count Pulaski, and Sergeant Jasper, of Revolutionary fame; one in Court House Square to W. W. Gordon, the first president of the Central Railroad of Georgia, and one to the Confederate dead.

The city The city is built mostly of bricks, and many of its residences are handsome specimens of architecture. Among the public buildings the custom-house, county court-house, city exchange, cotton exchange, board of trade, Hodgson Hall (the library and depository of the Georgia Historical Society), the Guard's arsenal, Armory Hall, Savannah Hospital, masonic temple, Odd Fellows’ hall, Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the theatre are worthy of note. There are in the city 39 churches (18 white, 21 colored), a cathedral, 3 synagogues, 3 hospitals, (one for colored), 9 banks with capital and surplus of $4,500,000, 6 savings-banks, the Bethesda Orphan House (established by Whitfield in 1740), the Female Orphan Asylum, the Infirmary for Colored People, and the Abrams (widows') Home. The chief of the churches are the Independent Presbyterian, St. John's (Episcopal), cathedral of St. John the Baptist, and the synagogue of Mickva Israel. The public schools are well conducted, and liberal provision is made for the education of all classes.

The harbor of Savannah is one of the best on the south Atlantic coast, and the river is navigable for steamers to Augusta, about 200 miles (by channel) inland. Steamships run regularly to Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston, and a large business is carried on by steamers along the inland coast waterways. The chief articles of export are cotton (average 1,000,000 bales per annum), naval stores, rice, lumber, and phosphate rock, besides which the neighboring country supplies large freights of early vegetables. The value of its exports, foreign and coastwise, were in 1892 over $150,000,000.

Savannah has electric-light- and gas-works, water-works, 25 miles of electric street-railways, a cotton-factory, a knitting-factory, 3 ice-factories, 3 rice-pounding mills, 5 fertilizer factories, 1 cotton-seed oil mill, 7 planing-mills, 2 breweries, foundries, soap-works, steam-bakeries, and all of the many smaller manufacturing concerns necessary to the business of a large city. It was founded by General James Oglethorpe in 1733, and was chartered as a city in 1789. Its population in 1850 was 15,312; in 1860, 22,292; in 1870, 28,235; in 1880, 30,709; in 1890, 43,189.

Lippincott's Gazetteer of the World: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World Containing Notices of Over One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Places ... Joseph Thomas January 1, 1895 J.B. Lippincott

Visit Savannah, Georgia, USA
Discover the people who lived there, the places they visited and the stories they shared.


Savannah, Georgia, USA

Savannah, Georgia, USA

Savannah, Georgia, USA

Savannah, Georgia, USA

Savannah, Georgia, USA

The comments you read here belong only to the person who posted them. We reserve the right to remove off-topic and inappropriate comments.