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Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
1895 - Saint John



Saint John, a city and seaport of New Brunswick, commercial metropolis of the province, and capital." co. of St. John, is picturesquely situated at the mouth of a river of its own name, on a rocky peninsula projecting into the harbor, 190 miles N.W. of Halifax, and 761 miles S.E. of Montreal. Lat. 45° 14' 6" N.; lon. 66° 3' 30" W. The city is regularly laid out and well built. The buildings are chiefly of brick and stone, the principal public edifices being St. Mary's cathedral (Roman Catholic), lunatic asylum, city hospital, court-house and jail, marine hospital, penitentiary, almshouse, male orphan asylum, academy of music, dramatic lyceum, mechanics’ institute, skating-rink, barracks, and the 34 places of worship. The educational institutions comprise a grammar-school, a Madras school, and a number of public and private schools. St. John has a number of religious and charitable societies, a public library, 2 banks and 2 branch banks, a savings-bank, an efficient fire-brigade, fire-alarm telegraph, 4 daily and several weekly newspapers, and a number of hotels. (The thriving suburb of Carleton, on the opposite side of the harbor, is included within the city corporation.) The harbor of St. John is capacious, safe, and never obstructed by ice. Its entrance, about 2 miles S. of the city, is protected by Partridge Island, on which are a quarantine hospital and a light-house. On the E. side of the channel below the town a breakwater has been constructed to intercept the violence of the waves occasioned by southerly gales. The entrance of the river St. John into the harbor, about 1 1/ 2 miles above the city, is through a rocky gorge 90 yards wide and 400 yards long, occasioning very remarkable falls, and spanning the gorge about 100 feet above low water is a suspension-bridge 640 feet long. St. John is the entrepôt of a wide extent of country abounding in agricultural re sources, minerals, and valuable timber, and its situation at the mouth of a large river, with a harbor open all the year round, with railways running from it in every direction, with extensive maritime and manufacturing interests, indicates its great commercial importance. St. John has manufactories of iron castings, steam-engines, machinery, edge tools, nails, cotton and woollen goods, boots and shoes, leather, wooden-ware, soap and candles, carriages, locomotives, agricultural implements, lumber, paper, sugar-boxes, &c., and its most important branch of industry is ship building. Between 600 and 900 men are yearly engaged in the fisheries in the harbor of St. John. Salmon, shad, herrings, alewives, halibut, and haddock are taken in large quantities. The streets are lighted with gas, and the city is well supplied with water from a lake 4 miles distant. The railway system of New Brunswick centres at St. John. The great Intercolonial Railway connects the city with Nova Scotia and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the European & North American Railway connects it with Bangor, Me. St. John was created a town by royal charter in 1785. The city and county return three members to the House of Commons and six to the provincial legislature. Pop. of city in 1871, 28,805; in 1881, 26,127; in 1891, 24,184.

Lippincott's Gazetteer of the World: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World Containing Notices of Over One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Places ... Joseph Thomas January 1, 1895 J.B. Lippincott

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Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada