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Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
1895 - Minneapolis



Minneapolis, the first city of Minnesota in population and importance, and in population the eighteenth of the United States, the capital of Hennepin co., is situated on both banks of the Mississippi River, at the Falls of St. Anthony, 10 miles W. by N. of St. Paul. It is near lat. 44° 58' N. and lon. 93° 18' W. Its invigorating climate has given it great repute as a health resort. The winter in this region is cold, but clear, the average summer temperature is below 70° F., and the autumn is long. Built upon a high and picturesque table-land, Minneapolis, with an area of 54 square miles, is laid out with regularity, and many of its intersecting streets are from 80 to 100 feet in width. The river is spanned by 9 highway and 6 railroad bridges, most of them built of iron, and several of them great works of engineering. The city has a park area of 1500 acres (valued at more than $4,000,000), including 22 parks, 8 parkways and boulevards, 4 large lakes, and the Falls of Minnehaha. Natural advantages, liberally developed, are making Minneapolis a city of great beauty. Here is the seat of the University of Minnesota, non-sectarian, and providing free tuition and equal privileges for both sexes. It was founded in 1868, and has 8 colleges, with (1894) 1800 students, 120 instructors, a large library, buildings which cost $870,000, a campus of 45 acres, and, connected with its agricultural college, an experimental farm 250 acres in extent. Its colleges are all well organised and conducted. Here is also Augsburg Theological Seminary, now in its twenty-fifth year, and just without the city limits, in the Midway District, are Hamline University and Macalester College. The city has 49 school buildings, 4 high schools, 632 teachers, and about 30,000 ' There are also many private and parochial schools. Besides 2 opera-houses and 3 first-class theatres, Minneapolis has several music and assembly halls, one, that of the Exposition Building, with a seating capacity of 16,000. Among the admirable structures of the city is the public library, finished in 1889 at a cost of $270,000, containing 30,000 volumes and commodious reading-rooms. In this building also are quartered the Society of Fine Arts and the Academy of Science. Other great buildings are the Syndicate Block, the New York Life, the Lumber Exchange, the West Hotel, the Young Men's Christian Association, the masonic temple, and the Guaranty Loan building. This last, erected at a cost of $1,500,000 and covering half an acre, is perhaps the finest office-building in the world. These all are constructed of varieties of Minnesota building-stone. A new edifice for city hall and court-house combined is now being erected, the cost of which when completed, including the site, is estimated at about $4,000,000. This city has extensive water-, gas-, and electric-works. Beautiful suburbs are rapidly springing up around it. Lake Minnetonka, but 7 miles away, and accessible by 3 lines of railroad, is already a favorite summer resort. In the Midway District, common to both Minneapolis and St. Paul, though mostly belonging to the latter, are the 4 thriving villages of Merriam Park, St. Anthony Park, Hamline, and Macalester. By its electric car system, complete within its own limits, Minneapolis has also hourly communication with St. Paul. Minneapolis has 167 churches, connected with which are many missions and benevolent societies; 7 private and 2 public hospitals, and 2 free dispensaries; philanthropic institutions, among which are the Sheltering Arms, for poor children, the Jones-Harrison Home for aged women, the Catholic Orphan Asylum, and the Washburn Home for orphans, all liberally endowed. In this city are many associations for purposes of intellectual, aesthetic, moral, and social culture. Here are published 63 periodicals, including 5 prominent dailies, about 12 leading weeklies, and several valuable semi-monthly and monthly journals. Ten weekly newspapers are supported by Scandinavian citizens. With its magnificent water-power, Minneapolis now ranks seventh among the manufacturing cities of the country. In flour and lumber products it is the foremost city of the world, its 20 flour-mills having a daily capacity of 44,000 barrels. Its assessed valuation, based upon forty per cent. of the market value of its assessable property, is $138,000,000. It has 6 national and 15 state banks, with an aggregate capital of $9,000,000. Its grain-elevator capacity is 17,000,000 bushels; yearly flour output, $35,000,000; lumber output, $6,000,000; savings deposits, $5,000,000. The number of railroads entering the city is 15. Pop. in 1870, 13,066, or including St. Anthony (incorporated with Minneapolis in 1873), 18,079; in 1880, 46,887; in 1890, 164,738.

Lippincott's Gazetteer of the World: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World Containing Notices of Over One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Places ... Joseph Thomas January 1, 1895 J.B. Lippincott

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Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA