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Detroit, Michigan, USA - 1916


Detroit, de-troit' (Fr. Detroit, da'trwa', from the " strait" which constitutes the Detroit River), the metropolis of Michigan and seat of justice for Wayne co., is a port of entry very favorably situated at the head of the Detroit River, 18 miles above Lake Erie, and at the foot of Lake St. Clair, opposite Windsor, Walkerville. and Sandwich, in Canada. Lat. of city-hall, 42° 19' 51" N. ; Lon. 83° 2' 54.6" W. Detroit is an important railway junction, the Grand Trunk, the Michigan Central, the Wabash, and numerous other roads centring here or passing through the city. It has a river-front of many miles. The river, "the Dardanelles of the New World," is here half a mile to 3 miles wide, has no freshets, and makes an admirable harbor. The city, which occupies a rather flat site about 580 feet above the sea, is laid oat on the rectangular plan, with a number of imposing centrally radiating avenues and boulevards. The chief of these, representing the commercial activity and life of the city, is Woodward Avenue, which divides the city into two nearly equal parts. Its expansion, about J mile from the river, is known as the Campus Martins. Among the public and other structures are the city-hall, government and county buildings, public library (containing upward of 180,000 volumes), Harper Hospital, and a museum of art. The educational institutions comprise Detroit College, Detroit Colleges of Law and Medicine, the Michigan College of Medicine and Surgery, and the Academy of the Sacred Heart. Grand Circus Park is a tastefully laid out square with trees and fountains. A soldiers' monument, designed by Randolph Rogers, adorns the site in front of the city-hall. The city is now surrounded by a wide boulevard, which begins and terminates at the river-front. Belle Isle, reached by a bridge across an arm of the river, is a beautiful public park, covering about 700 acres. The commerce of Detroit is enormous, its main traffic being in grain, wool, pork, lard, hides, and copper. The staple manufactures are those of iron and steel goods, boilers and engines, cars and car-wheels, electrical appliances, drugs, paints, varnish, stoves, and tobacco. It has important lumbering interests and large tanneries. The annual value of the manufactured product is about $100,000,000, the foundry and machine-shop products in 1900 being placed at $8,940,000, and drugs at $4,900,000. The site of Detroit was part of New France. It was settled as a trading and fortified post by Cadillac in 1701, became British in 1760, American in 1790, British again in 1812, and finally American in 1813. It was incorporated as a city in 1824. It was the capital of Michigan Territory and for a time of the state. Pop. in 1810, 770 ; in 1850, 21,019 ; in 1860, 45,019; in 1870, 79.577; in 1880, 116,340; in 1890, 205,876 ; in 1900, 285,704.

Lippincott's New Gazetteer: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World, Containing the Most Recent and Authentic Information Respecting the Countries, Cities, Towns, Resorts, Islands, Rivers, Mountains, Seas, Lakes, Etc., in Every Portion of the Globe, Part 1 Angelo Heilprin Louis Heilprin - January 1, 1916 J.B. Lippincott - Publisher

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Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Detroit, Michigan, USA

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