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flag  History of Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Journey back in time to Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

(Port Royal, Acadia)

Visit Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada. Discover its history. Learn about the people who lived there through stories, old newspaper articles, pictures, postcards and ancestry.

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Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada - Map of Acadia www.acadian-cajun.com/ acadmap.htm

"The Acadians were a mixed blood people with a distinct culture unlike the French or English. They were a high bred people more aligned to the Indian culture than the Europeans. The Acadians were a collection of closely knit families. Family, God, and land were important to them. No one was rich, no one was poor. They were non-materialistic. No political parties were required. Acadian life was calm, gentle and tolerant. Crime was unheard of. They had no social classes. Acadians resisted political or moral rule. The church had no more authority than minor religious administration. The church had its cloak of invincibility removed and was vulnerable to personal criticism. They were pacifists by nature. Some called their culture a sort of utopia. These attributes were a source of irritation to both Church and State."

telusplanet.net

The Port-Royal Habitation was constructed in 1605 near the mouth of the Dauphin River [now the Annapolis River]. Samuel de Champlain was its architect and it had been the center of a small French settlement.

In 1613 Port-Royal was sacked and burned by troops from Virginia but the name Port-Royal survived and after the arrival of Acadian families from France in the 1630s the area became the birth place of Acadia.
acadian-home.org

Beginning in 1755 and lasting for several years, Acadians from Port-Royal were deported by the English. Most were sent to Massachusetts, North Carolina, Connecticut, New York and South Carolina.
Story of Acadians, Episode 1, Shaw Community Link




There is MUCH more to discover about Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada. Read on!

Annapolis Royal Nostalgia: Vintage Photos, Ads, and Postcards

Map of Acadia
www.acadian-cajun.com/ acadmap.htm
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Map
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Map of Acadia
www.acadian-cajun.com/ acadmap.htm
Church of St. Louis
540 St George St., Annapolis Royal, NOVA SCOTIA
Established 1835
Source: Goog
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Photograph
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Church of St. Louis
540 St George St., Annapolis Royal, NOVA SCOTIA
Established 1835
Source: Google maps
The General's Bridge, near Annapolis (Nova Scotia)
Canadian Scenery, 
by N.P. Willis, Illustrated
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Artwork
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The General's Bridge, near Annapolis (Nova Scotia)
Canadian Scenery,
by N.P. Willis, Illustrated by William Henry Bartlett, 1842
View from Old Fort, Annapolis Royal, N.S.
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Postcard
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View from Old Fort, Annapolis Royal, N.S.
Powder Magazine, Old Fort, Annapolis Royal, N.S.
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

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Powder Magazine, Old Fort, Annapolis Royal, N.S.
Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia
Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

Postcard
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Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia
Read more about Pierre Toussaint RICHARD

Discover Annapolis Royal: History, News, Travel, and Stories

Add informationAdd History/News/Story
1605 - Samuel de Champlain establishes the first successful New France Colony at Port Royal
1604, June 20 - Pierre de Monts and Samuel de Champlain reach the Annapolis Basin; Champlain names the whole area Port Royal. The following year, 1605, the French will settle here. De Poutrincourt requests this land for his retirement, a request de Monts will grant.

canadachannel.ca/ todayincanadianhistory/ index.php/ June_20

1604 - October 2 - Samuel de Champlain arrives back at Ste-Croix with Jean Ralluau after exploring the coast of Maine; they have a hard winter with Pierre de Monts and 77 others, and the following Spring move across the Bay of Fundy to found Port Royal on the Annapolis Basin.

canadachannel.ca/ todayincanadianhistory/ index.php/ October_2

1605, June 18 - Pierre de Mons moves colony from Ste-Croix across the Bay of Fundy to the more temperate Annapolis Basin, to a site Samuel de Champlain had scouted, end starts building Port Royal with St Croix timber; habitation the first permanent European settlement in Canada. Champlain then sails down the New... Read MORE...


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1610 - June 24 - Micmac chief Membertou and 20 family members baptized by Jesse La Fleche at Port Royal; First Roman Catholic missionary in Canada; First Christian converts in New France

canadachannel.ca/ todayincanadianhistory/ index.php/ June_24
1613 Port Royal looted and burned by pirate Captain Argyle from Virginia.

1629 July three ships with Scotish settlers arrive at Port Royal.

1631 - July 10 - King Charles I [England] orders William Alexander to give Port Royal back to the French and destroy the fort built by his son
Scots are forced to abandon their settlement at Port Royal.
canadachannel.ca/ todayincanadianhistory/ index.php/ July_10
1635 - Port Royal moved across the river.

1643 Fort Anne built at new Port Royal site.

1650 - English 'Brawn'
Acadia (Nova Scotia) recipes called for English ‘Brawn’. Brawn was originally for the flesh of the pigs head that has been boiled, chopped and molded. In Acadia (Nova Scotia) it meant a veal-shank and pork-hock stew made by boiling the meat off the bones in seasoned water. The stock from that water was called ‘Brawn’.

www.many-roads.com/2010/04/20/ a-history-of-french-canada-1650-to-1669/
1654 Captain Sedwidge with Orders from Oliver Cromwell, lord protector of England, captures Port Royal.

1654 - Acadia
The Acadian children born between 1654 and 1670 had little or no knowledge of France. Unlike New France, they were not governed by the religious, nor the seigniorial system or an Intendant. Seigneuries were granted at Port Royal, Beaubassin and along the St. John River, but had no influence on daily life. The Acadians adopted the Indian practice of family networks, forging strong family kinships among themselves. The Jesuits, Capuchins, Recollets and Sulpicians took part in religious and educational needs, but no order achieved unquestioned authority like in New France. Every Acadian settlement contained Metis families, usually of Micmac ancestry, and they were readily accepted as Acadians.

The population of Port Royal, Acadia is listed as 250 people, mostly from France. Thomas Temple (1615-1674) and two others obtained the rights of trade and government in Acadia ( Nova Scotia) following the English conquest this year.


www.many-roads.com/2010/04/20/ a-history-of-french-canada-1650-to-1669/
1658 - The population of Port Royal, Acadia is no more than 250 souls.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french16.htm
1667 - Treaty of Breda - Acadia is given back to France
The Treaty of Breda restored Acadia to France. Paris largely ignored Acadia, and Quebec's war with the Iroquois left little time for Acadia concerns. The colonists of Port Royal expanded to establish colonies at Grand Pre, Piziquid (Windsor, Acadia (Nova Scotia), Cobequid (Truro, Acadia (Nova Scotia)) and Beaubassin (New Brunswick-Acadia (Nova Scotia) border). They are living like true republicans, not acknowledging royal or judicial authority. They became a new culture of people called the Acadians. Their natural abundance freed them from daily drudgery, and outsiders considered them lazy, obstinate, ignorant (few could read or write), yet say they have great hospitality are content and practical. The Acadians would suffer for the actions of the Quebec French against the English.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french20.htm
1670 - Acadia
The French decision to not send colonists to Canada in 1666 had a profound impact on Canada as Acadia had a population of 400 whereas Massachusetts had a population of 40,000.

Acadia had less than 500 European Settlers after nearly 3/ 4 century of settlement. Civil war and conflicts with the English prevented and significant settlement.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french21.htm
1690 - Port Royal is captured by British forces led by Phipps.

www.acadian-cajun.com/ acadtime.htm
1695 - Fort Anne, (1695-1708) (Annapolls, Acadia ( Nova Scotia)) is established.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/ dgarneau/ french25.htm
1699 - A crop failure at Port Royal, Acadia caused extensive suffering in the colony.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/ dgarneau/ french25.htm
1704 - Attacked
June 20: Benjamin Church (1639-1718), with 700 men, three warships and fourteen transports, burned Les Mines (Grand Pre), took Cobequid (Truro) and Piziquid (Pigiguit), and wasted Beaubassin, Acadia. They laid siege to Port Royal but they refused to surrender, and the English (speaking people) departed.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french26.htm
1706 - English Repelled
John March of Newbury received a commission to take Fort Royal in Acadia. One thousand and seventy six English, with four hundred and fifty sailors, are under his command. Fort Royal, defended by Governor Subercase with Intendant de Goutin and three hundred French, repelled the English (speaking people) in June. Unable to breach the Fort, the army returned to Boston.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french27.htm
1707 Port Royal attacked twice by New England.

1710 - British Capture Port Royal, Rename Fort Anne
The Acadian community of Port Royal is captured by Francis Nickolson for the British and renamed it Fort Anne, and the community, Annapolis Royal. Daniel d'Auger de Subercase (1661-1732), with less than 300 men, capitulated to a landed force of 2,000 English.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/ dgarneau/ french27.htm

1710 - October 13 - Queen Anne's War - Acadian governor Daniel d'Auger de Subercase, with less than 300 men, surrenders Port Royal to Francis Nicholson after an eight day siege that began on October 5. Nicholson renames the fort Annapolis Royal in honour of Queen Anne. The Conquest of Acadia marks the end of French rule throughout mainland Nova Scotia and the beginning of permanent British control over the peninsular portion of Acadia, which they rename Nova Scotia; also the first time the British took and held a French colonial possession.

canadachannel.ca/ todayincanadianhistory/ index.php/ October_13
1754 - French and Indian War at Port Royal

www.worldatlas.com/ webimage/ countrys/ namerica/ province/ nsztimeln.htm
1755 - Grand Derangement
The "Grand Derangement" the forced deportation of Acadians is considered the beginning of the Cajun culture.

Of the 8 to 10 thousand Acadians deported, 3/ 4 arrived in the American colonies or were incarcerated in Halifax or London. The rest hid in the woods of New Brunswick, or walked to Quebec. Many regrouped in northern New Brunswick, others to Prince Edward Island and some to Nova Scotia. They all lost their lands and equipment, every thing was British dominated.

September to December: The British Governor of Nova Scotia, Charles Lawrence, serving from July 23, 1756 to September 24, 1762, expelled and deported eight to ten thousand settlers, spreading them down the Eastern Seaboard to Louisiana where they called themselves Cajuns. Some place the numbers closer to 10,000 people. Col. John Winslow (1703-1774), in charge of the first embarkation’s, called it a scene of confusion, despair and desolation. The women are in great distress. They carried their children in... Read MORE...

1756 - Virginia Rejects Acadians
About 1,200 Acadians were sent to Virginia but were never let off the ships, because they had not been expected and they were not wanted. They sat on the beaches for six months. Having arrived in the fall of 1755, they were sent to England in the spring of 1756. Once in England, they were dispersed to Bristol, Falmouth, Liverpool and Southampton where they were detained (held prisoners) for seven years. When the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1763, they were repatriated to France. They did not fit there either. Their attitudes, customs, and language had changed. Other than sharing a common religion and more or less a common language, the Acadians had little in common with the French.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french36.htm
1763 - Nova Scotia
The English land cleared about 11,000 French Acadians from Nova Scotia during the period of 1755 to 1763, to make room for English and Scottish settlers as those Acadians held the best land. The Acadians held in England are shipped to France and France reports 2,400 are on welfare. St. Milo, France received 1,560 Acadian refugees. As a result of the English Land Clearance, Acadia is renamed Nova Scotia.

The Treaty of Paris gave Acadie to England.

France says it doesn't want New France. All they want of Canada is their fish. The English don't know what to do about the French Canadians. Benjamin Franklin of Philadelphia assures London that within 1/ 2 a century, French Canada will be absorbed into the English colonies in religion, language and manners. The rest will be bought out and sent back to France.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french38.htm
1764 - Acadians Return to Nova Scotia
The Acadians were finally allowed to return to Nova Scotia in 1764. However, the fertile lands that once were theirs were now occupied by English settlers. Since the British would not allow the Acadians to form large settlements, they gradually settled along the various remote coastal regions of the province such as Baie Ste-Marie.

www.telusplanet.net/ public/dgarneau/french39.htm
1835 - Church of St. Louis established at Annapolis Royal

www.gcatholic.org
1873
ANNAPOLIS, formerly called PORT ROYAL, a seaport town of Nova Scotia, at the mouth of the River Annapolis, a fine inlet of the Bay of Fundy, 129 miles W. of Halifax. It is the most ancient settlement in this part of North America, having been founded in l604 by De Monts, a Frenchman. Subsequently, in the time of Queen Anne, it was occupied by the British, whence the name of Annapolis, or City of Anne. It was the seat of Government until 1749. Annapolis boasts of one of the prettiest sites in Nova Scotia. It is the western terminus of the W. & A. R., and has daily steam communication with St. John, N.B., distant 63 miles. It contains a telegraph office, a branch bank, a Dominion savings bank, a well furnished reading room and library, a printing office issuing a weekly news-paper, 9 hotels, and about 25 stores. Shipbuilding is largely engaged in. The total number of arrivals at this port for 1872 was 133 (tons 15,354), and clearances 106 (tons 12,557). Total value of imports $42,191;... Read MORE...

1880 - FIRE RECORD. Nova Scotia Town in Flames.
HALIFAX, N. S., August 3 .- The upper end of the town of Annapolis is in flames, extending from J. B. Wilson's to R. S. Hardwick's and back to No. 10 Victoria street. The wardens have telegraphed to Kentville for a train to bring a fire engine from Bridgetown.

Thirteen Buildings Burned.

HALIFAX, N. S., August 3. - A telegram from Annapolis says the fire there to-day destroyed thirteen houses and stores and some outhouses. The loss on buildings is about $28,000; on stocks and furniture, $8,000; insurance, $16,000. The fire was of incendiary origin.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
August 4, 1880
1895 - Annapolis (Port Royal)
Annapolis, formerly Port Royal, a port of entry of Nova Scotia, at the mouth of the river Annapolis, a fine inlet of the Bay of Fundy, 129 miles W. of Halifax. It is the most ancient settlement in this part of North America, having been founded in 1604 by De Monts, a Frenchman. In the time of Queen Anne it was occupied by the British, whence the name of Annapolis, or City of Anne. It was the seat of government until 1749. It has railway communication with Halifax and Yarmouth, and daily steam communication with St. John, New Brunswick, distant 63 miles. It has 2 branch banks, a Dominion savings-bank, a weekly newspaper, 9 hotels, and about 30 stores. Ship-building is largely engaged in. Pop. (1891) 959.
Lippincott's Gazetteer of the World: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World Containing Notices of Over One Hundred and Twenty-five Thousand Places ... Joseph Thomas January 1, 1895 J.B. Lippincott
1916
Annapolis, or Annapolis Royal, formerly Port Royal, a port of entry of Nova Scotia, at the mouth of the river Annapolis, a fine inlet of the Bay of Fundy, 129 mile; by rail W. of Halifax. It is the most ancient European settlement in this part of North America, having been founded in 1604 by De Monts, a Frenchman. In the time of Queen Anne it was occupied by the British, whence the name of Annapolis, or City of Anne. It was the seat of government until 1749. It is on the Dominion Atlantic R., and has daily steam communication with St. John, New Brunswick. It is a favorite summer-resort. Pop. in 1901, 1019.
Lippincotts New Gazetteer: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer Or Geographical Dictionary of the World, Containing the Most Recent and Authentic Information Respecting the Countries, Cities, Towns, Resorts, Islands, Rivers, Mountains, Seas, Lakes, Etc., in Every Portion of the Globe, Part 1 Angelo Heilprin Louis Heilprin - January 1, 1916 J.B. Lippincott - Publisher
Annapolis Royal
Annapolis Royal, NS, incorporated as a town in 1893, population 481 (2011c), 444 (2006c). The Town of Annapolis Royal is located on the south side of the Annapolis River, about 10 km from its mouth near the western shore of Nova Scotia. The entire basin was named Port-Royal by Samuel de Champlain and Pierre du Gua de Monts when they discovered the area in 1604. The site was amenable for settlement, offering a temperate climate and arable land, and was perfect for military purposes, protected by surrounding hills.

Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt established a small group of farmers there in 1606 and Acadian settlement spread slowly along the basin and river. The habitation was destroyed in 1613 by Samuel Argall and William Alexander erected a fort at present-day Fort Anne, 15 km upriver, in 1629. In 1632 the fort was ceded to the French, and in 1636 it was assigned to Charles de Menou d'Aulnay, who transferred most of the population of Acadia to the area. The fort was rebuilt in... Read MORE...

2023 - Here's a list of places to go and things to do in Annapolis Royal:
Fort Anne National Historic Site: Start your visit with a trip to Fort Anne, Canada's oldest national historic site. Explore the well-preserved fortifications, visit the museum, and enjoy the scenic views of the Annapolis River. You can also participate in guided tours to learn about the area's military history.

Annapolis Royal Historic Gardens: These beautifully landscaped gardens are a must-visit for nature enthusiasts and garden lovers. You'll find a diverse collection of plants, walking paths, and themed gardens that change with the seasons.

Port-Royal National Historic Site: Discover the reconstruction of the original French settlement at Port-Royal. It offers a fascinating glimpse into the early history of the area, complete with costumed interpreters who bring the past to life.

Annapolis Royal Farmers' and Traders' Market: If you're visiting on a Saturday, make sure to stop by this lively market. You'll find fresh produce, local crafts, delicious baked goods, and a... Read MORE...

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Ancestors Who Were Born or Died in Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

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Ancestors buried in Annapolis Royal - Cemeteries in Annapolis Royal, Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada

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Genealogy Resources for Annapolis Royal

The Registers of St. Jean-Baptiste, Annapolis Royal, 1702-1755

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Updated: 9/15/2023 4:32:30 PM