Pawtucket, Rhode Island, USA
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1883 - LARGE FIRE IN PAWTUCKET. SEVERAL BUILDINGS DESTROYED, CAUSING A LOSS OF OVER $100,000.


1883 - LARGE FIRE IN PAWTUCKET. SEVERAL BUILDINGS DESTROYED, CAUSING A LOSS OF OVER $100,000.

PROVIDENCE, R. I., July 1. - Pawtucket was visited this morning by the most destructive fire for many years. The flames were discovered at 5:30 o'clock by a new-vendor in an unoccupied building known as the "Old Arcade," on the rear of East-avenue. The whole Fire Department was called out but the flames spread rapidly and after destroying the Arcade building extended to the adjoining buildings, until a dozen were on fire at once. The Dexter Yarn Company's mill, office, and storehouse, large wooden structures, were destroyed. The mill was used in the manufacture of knitting-cotton. The books and papers of the company and the private papers of H. H. Thomas, the President, were saved in the safe. All the machinery was damaged, and most of it rendered worthless. The mill was filled with finished yarn, and but little of value was saved. Tee[sic] loss is estimated at $100,000. There is an insurance of from $55,000 to $60,000 in foreign companies.

The upper floors of A. E. Tenny's machine shops were destroyed and the lower part was damaged. Loss, $7,000 to $8,000; covered by insurance. The Campbell Machine Company lost in its machine shop patterns and drawings valued at about $1,000. All the horses and some of the carriages in William Cooper's livery stable, to which the fire next spread, were saved. Some of the harness and a quantity of hay and grain were burned. Carpenter's Block, a three-story wooden building, occupied mainly by secret societies, narrowly escaped destruction. The old Weeden homestead was partially burned. Many other buildings took fire, but were saved, being only slightly injured. It is thought that the fire was the work of tramps, who have lodged in the old structure. The entire loss is estimated at $115,000. Most of the property destroyed was insured. The 26 telephone wires to this city were ruined, and the only way to communicate with the city authorities was via Boston.

 

The New York Times

New York, New York



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