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flag  Joseph  CASAUBON dit DIDIER

  (b. 26 September 1790La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Province of Québec, Canada   d. 23 April 1844La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Lower Canada )  

Joseph CASAUBON dit DIDIER was born 26 September 1790 in La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Province of Québec, Canada . Joseph CASAUBON dit DIDIER was the child of Jean-Baptiste CASAUBON dit DIDIER and Catherine FAUTEUX and the grandchild of: (paternal)  Joseph CASAUBON dit DIDIER and Marie-Josephte DESROSIERS DU TREMBLE (maternal)  Pierre FAUTEUX and Gabrielle-Élisabeth DÉSORCY

Joseph CASAUBON dit DIDIER died 23 April 1844 in La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Lower Canada .
Over time, Quebec has gone through a series of name changes
From its inception in the early 1600s until 1760, it was called Canada, New France.
1760 to 1763, it was simply Canada
1763 to 1791 - Province of Quebec
1791 to 1867 - Lower Canada
1867 to present - Quebec, Canada.

Thanks to Micheline MacDonald for providing this information.
Did You Know?Quebec - Did you know? Behind each habitant's house was a small addition used as a storeroom. Not far away were the barn and the stable, built always of untrimmed logs, the intervening chinks securely filled with clay or mortar. There was also a root-house, half-sunk in the ground or burrowed into the slope of a hill, where the habitant kept his potatoes and vegetables secure from the frost through the winter. Most of the habitants likewise had their own bake-ovens, set a convenient distance behind the house and rising four or five feet from the ground. These they built roughly of boulders and plastered with clay. With an abundance of wood from the virgin forests they would build a roaring fire in these ovens and finish the whole week's baking at one time. The habitant would often enclose a small plot of ground surrounding the house and outbuildings with a fence of piled stones or split rails, and in one corner he would plant his kitchen-garden.

Source: Daily Life in New France (www.chroniclesofamerica.com/ french/ daily_life_in_new_france.htm)
m. McLeod Anne
m. Neveu Genevieve
Did You Know? What is a 'dit/dite' name?  When the first settlers came to Canada from France it was a custom to add a 'dit' nickname to the surname. The English translation of 'dit' is 'said'. The Colonists of Nouvelle France added 'dit' names as distinguishers. A settler might have wanted to differentiate their family from their siblings by taking a 'dit' name that described the locale to which they had relocated. The acquiring of a 'dit' name might also be the result of a casual adoption, whereby the person wanted to honor the family who had raised them. Another reason was also to distinguish themselves by taking as a 'dit' name the town or village in France from which they originated. This custom ended around 1900 when people began using only one name, either the 'dit' nickname or their original surname.

Source: American-French Genealogical Society, Woonsocket, Rhode Island (www.afgs.org/ditnames/index1.html)

Pictures, Postcards and Records related to Joseph CASAUBON dit DIDIER (if available)



La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Québec, Canada (Ile Dupas) - Eglise de La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, built in 1852
121, rue de l’Église, Île Dupas, QUÉBEC
Source: wikipedia
La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, Québec, Canada (Ile Dupas)
Eglise de La Visitation-de-l'Île-Dupas, built in... Read MORE...

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Added: 5/13/2017 3:01:48 PM

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